2 FIGHTER SECTOR HEADQUARTERS
IN AUSTRALIA DURING WW2

hline.gif (2424 bytes)

visits since 15 April 2001

 

Formed as No.2 Fighter Sector Headquarters and later renamed as No.102 Fighter Control Unit.

Formed New Lambton NSW 25 Feb 1942
Renamed 102 FCU on 7 Mar 1944
Moved Ash Island 3 Dec 1944
Disbanded Ash Island 12 Feb 1945

The Royal Australian Air Force commandeered New Lambton Public School at New Lambton in New South Wales in March 1942. The school pupils were put up at other schools in the district at Lambton, Adamstown, Hamilton and Cardiff.

No. 2 Fighter Sector was responsible for fighter aircraft control and coordination for the Newcastle and Hunter region and was formed on 25 February 1942. Squadron Leader M.H. Everest was the first Commanding Officer and the principal aircraft controller.

The headmaster's residence at New Lambton Public School was used as No. 2 Fighter Sector Headquarters. The main school building was used as the Operations Room where radar units received and plotted aircraft movements on plotting tables. Telephone links to defence installations enabled information to be provided to be able to scramble fighters in the event of being attacked by the Japanese.


New Lambton Public School Building
(Ralph Snowbell Collection, 1901)

 


New Lambton Public School Headmasterís Residence
(Ralph Snowbell Collection, 1901)

No. 2 Fighter Sector commenced 24 hour operations on 29 March 1942 and had an operating strength of 25 RAAF officers, one WAAAF officer, one RAAF Nursing Sister, 38 RAAF airmen and 68 other WAAAF personnel.

Additional facilities were constructed during April and May of 1942 including ablutions blocks, a new kitchen, messes, a boiler house and a WAAAF's laundry.

No. 2 Fighter Sector became the training centre for many other Fighter Sector units being formed around Australia and a Central Training School was set up to train operations room personnel and to conduct refresher courses. Personnel from No.1 Fighter Sector (Sydney), No 3. Fighter Sector (Townsville), No. 7 Fighter Sector (Melbourne) and No. 8 Fighter Sector (Brisbane), as well as personnel from United States Army Air Corps (USAAC) trained at New Lambton.

In October 1943, No. 2 Fighter Sector was redesignated as 102 Fighter Sector HQ and in March 1944 it was again redesignated as 102 Fighter Control Unit (FCU).

In late 1944, the operations at New Lambton were scaled down and the main 102 FCU headquarters were moved to Ash Island on 3 December 1944.

From 21 January 1945, 102 FCU was placed on a care and maintenance basis and was disbanded on 12 February 1945.

The New Lambton Public School was returned to the NSW Education Department in 1946. All the temporary huts and buildings built for the RAAF were removed and re-erected at RAAF Williamtown. The Principal's house which was next door to the original school in Regent Street, New Lambton was demolished in 1946. The original school building which housed the Operations Room was demolished in 1953 after becoming structurally unstable due to mine subsidence from old coal mine workings underneath the building.

New Lambton Public School is authorised to fly the RAAF Ensign and is the only school in Australia that is permitted to do so.

 

REFERENCE BOOKS

"The First 50 Years"  The History of the RAAF Base Williamtown

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I'd like to thank Cameron Alexander for his assistance with this web page.

 

A typical RAAF Fighter Sector Headquarters

 

Can anyone tell me more about 2 FSHQ?

 

In Association with Amazon.com

Heaps of WW2
books available at
Amazon.com

                         "Australia @ War"
                         

Copyright

©  Peter Dunn 2003

Disclaimer

Click here to E-Mail me
any information or photographs


 Australia @ War
Available on CD-Rom

Peter Dunn's
explode.gif (15799 bytes) AUSTRALIA @ WAR explode.gif (15799 bytes)
WWW.OZATWAR.COM


Do you need a holiday!
Sun, surf, beautiful beaches and lots more!


  Genealogy Software
190 Mbytes of Genealogy Indexes & Programs

This page first produced 15 April 2001

This page last updated 18 July 2007