NO TIME FOR FEAR
BY DIANE BURKE FESSLER

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The voices you hear in No Time For Fear speak proudly. Nothing prepared these nurses for the magnitude of a Pearl Harbor bombing or the sight of an overfilled ward of legless and armless young men fresh from battles in France or Iwo Jima. This oral history collection provides an important counterpoint to the strategy and planning of warfare so often chronicled by the male warrior. Women, moreover, take center stage. One smells, sees, and feels war through their senses.

"My parents took me to the train when I joined the army, and I remember Mom saying, You might accept sending your son to war, but not your daughter." As she remembers her mother's words, the graying grandmother becomes the twenty-one-year-old nurse, eager to meet the world in 1942.

Nurses served bravely under fire beginning with the first battle of World War II at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. In the Philippines and Guam American military nurses were captured by the Japanese and continued to use their skills to aid other prisoners, despite having to endure devastating illnesses and extreme hardship.

World War II is recorded in books, films, awards, and ceremonies that deservedly commend the brave fighting men, strategies of the generals and admirals, as well as the ships, tanks, and planes used to carry out the battles. Consistently, there is a serious lack of recognition of nurses who were overseas with the soldiers, close to the fighting, and caring for wounded men brought straight from the battlefield. The nurses of the 1930s and 1940s who volunteered to join the army and navy have compelling stories that will now be recognized as an important part of that war's strategy.

 

Paperback, 280 pages, includes photographs

16 page index

 

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 Peter Dunn 2015

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This page first produced 23 April 2013

This page last updated 21 November 2015